An Archaeology of My Attention January 20, 2017

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An Archaeology of My Attention – January 20, 2017

  • A Personal Remembrance of Wayne Barrett – WNYC News – WNYC 011917
    Andrea Bernstein: Wayne Barrett, 71, dogged investigative reporter and one of the earliest biographers of Donald Trump, died of lung cancer Thursday. He just could not live to see Trump’s inauguration.
    There is no journalist I learned more from than Wayne. In the late 1980’s, as a low-level city worker, I was riveted by his book City for Sale about corruption in Mayor Ed Koch’s administration. I can literally remember turning the pages, thinking to myself, so this is the way the world works. It made me want to be a gumshoe reporter — like Wayne.
    He trained a whole generation of journalists to view every closed door as just a chance to walk up a back alley. He used to speak to student groups wearing a trench coat and a fedora. “I”m the people’s detective,” he would say, in his deep gravelly voice and a laugh that said: Can you believe this?
  • What Really Happened to the Stock Market During the Obama Years | Bloomberg 011917
    While the economic recovery under President Obama has been sluggish and underwhelming, slow and disappointing are hardly words you would use to describe the stock market’s performance under the outgoing president.
    Since Obama’s first inauguration on Jan. 20, 2009, U.S. equities have surged 12% a year, not counting dividends, in what turned out to be the second-longest bull market in history.
    To put that in perspective, those price gains were nearly four percentage points per year more than domestic equities have averaged since the end of World War II. They also compare favorably to the 4.6% annual losses suffered by the S&P 500 index of U.S. stocks under the eight years of Obama’s predecessor, President George W. Bush.
  • Steve Jobs saved Apple and Nike with the same piece of advice — Quartz
    Focus trumps opportunity: Why doing one thing well works
    With the floodgates of the internet permanently thrown open, we’re drowning in options and information when all our brains want is something simple.
    If you can tap into that simple, focused message, you’ll stand out.
  • A Tale of Two Economies | Bloomberg 011917
    David Ingold: When Barack Obama took the presidential oath of office in 2009, the economy was 14 months into a historic meltdown. The U.S. was losing more than 700,000 jobs a month, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was 42 percent below its 2007 high and one in 45 households would file for foreclosure during the year.
    The recession Obama inherited from George W. Bush officially ended midway through Obama’s first year in the Oval Office. But the rest of Obama’s presidency was largely defined by the ensuing economic recovery—one still underway as Trump takes office on Friday.
    By many measures, the U.S. economy has shown marked improvement since Obama took office. Median household income increased 5.2 percent in 2015, according to a September Census Bureau report – the biggest year-over-year increase since it began tracking wages in 1967. Traders watch anxiously as the Dow flirts with 20,000 for the first time in history. Home foreclosures dropped to an 11-year low in September. And Obama leaves behind a jobless rate of 4.7 percent, lower than anything seen during the Ford, Carter, Reagan and G.H.W. Bush presidencies.
  • How We’ll Know if Trump Is Making America Great Again | Bloomberg 011917
    Scott Lanman: Donald Trump’s “Make America Great Again” campaign refrain will become the driving vision of the federal government when the billionaire developer takes the oath of office as president. But how will we know just how great America is becoming?
    Here are the 10 best indicators to judge the impact of his policies in the next four years and determine whether the economy lives up to Trump’s pre-election promises.
    Beyond gross domestic product growth and better-known figures like wages and the trade deficit, other metrics worth watching include the pace of business creation and the share of prime-age workers in the labor force. Incorporating the forecasts of Bloomberg Intelligence Chief U.S. Economist Carl Riccadonna, we’ve divided the indicators into three groups: those most likely to improve, the ones that will stay about the same and figures that will probably go in the wrong direction.
  • Intercepted Russian Communications Part of Inquiry Into Trump Associates – NYTimes.com 011917
    American law enforcement and intelligence agencies are examining intercepted communications and financial transactions as part of a broad investigation into possible links between Russian officials and associates of President-elect Donald J. Trump, including his former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, current and former senior American officials said.
  • Donald Trump Hasn’t Been Able to Expand His Post-Election Support – The Atlantic
    Ronald Brownstein: Donald Trump always seems most grounded in chaos. He thrives on contradicting his aides, surprising his allies, disparaging his opponents. He revels in the tempest.
    This combustible approach has touched a chord with his base of primarily non-college-educated and non-urban white voters who have felt eclipsed both economically and culturally and slighted by the nation’s leadership. But he will arrive at his inaugural Friday facing more resistance in public opinion than any newly elected president in the history of polling, and with lingering clouds over his legitimacy—symbolized by the surprisingly widespread House Democratic boycott of the ceremony. Trump’s agenda is polarizing enough, but the intensity of that opposition appears rooted even more in his relentless belligerence toward any critical voice or institution.
  • How Twitter Can Help Trump Avert Catastrophe – The Atlantic 011917
    Conor Friedersdorf : Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey can take a simple step that could conceivably save humanity: He can impose an extra “authentication” step when the president tweets.
    Donald Trump’s inauguration makes this an urgent priority.
    Yes, President Obama’s Twitter account could’ve been hacked. But a major shift in policy or an outlandish statement on his feed would have been widely assumed to be the work of hackers. The erratic Trump won’t enjoy the benefit of that doubt.
  • Savvy CEOs Are Learning to Manage Trump – Bloomberg View 011917
    Joe Nocera: At first glance, it sure seems as though President-elect Donald Trump is having his way with big corporations. No sooner does he slam a fist on his desk, demanding that companies add American jobs, than they issue press releases promising to oblige.
    Wal-Mart will add 10,000 jobs, it announced earlier this week. General Motors plans to invest $1 billion and add 7,000 U.S. jobs, it said. Bayer AG, the German pharmaceutical giant, promised to invest $8 billion in America, and add 3,000 jobs. And soon.
  • The Ups and Downs of Portfolio Rebalancing – Bloomberg Gadfly
  • Why It Matters That Donald Trump Has No Inaugural Poet
  • The JCC Bomb Threats Confirm That Jewish Parents Are Right to Be Afraid
  • A Bulldozer and a Ballerina
  • Trump’s Planned Elimination of Violence Against Women Grants Is Pure Cruelty
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Attention Economy January 19, 2017

 

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Attention Economy January 19, 2017


Kellyanne Conway.


Marla Maples and Tiffany Trump receive free blowouts on Aug. 27, 2009, in London. [Slate/Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images]

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Attention Economy January 18, 2017

  • When Outside Art Became In: Obama’s Cultural Legacy – WNYC News – WNYC 011817
    In the spring of 2009, the White House held a poetry jam. Out walked a young man, sporting short hair and a sharp black suit. Looking like he was just out of college.
    “I’m actually working on a hiphop album,” he said. A concept album, he added, about the man he felt best embodied hiphop: Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton.
    The crowd giggled, unconvinced. President Obama, just a few months into his first term, covered his mouth in an effort to suppress a smile.
    “You laugh! But it’s true!” insisted Lin-Manuel Miranda, before finally launching into song. This was six years before “Hamilton the Musical,” well before Miranda became a household name. He looked nervous.
    Outside, the U.S. economy was in free fall. The unemployment rate was about to hit ten percent. But if there was one place where the Obama administration was consistently ahead of the curve, it was in the cultural sphere: over eight years, the White House served as a staging ground for countless artists, intellectuals and activists, especially those from communities of color, especially cultural producers from New York, long exiled from Washington.
  • The Meaning of Michelle: A Homage to the First Lady – The Takeaway – WNYC 011817
    Author Veronica Chambers has compiled an homage of original essays from a diverse group of contributors, like filmmaker Ava DuVernay, chef Marcus Samuelsson, and WNYC’s Rebecca Carroll, in a book called “The Meaning of Michelle: 16 Writers on the Iconic First Lady and How Her Journey Inspires Our Own.”
    Chambers is an author of numerous books, including the critically acclaimed memoir “Mama’s Girl.” Currently a JSK Fellow at Stanford University, she has also been a senior editor at The New York Times Magazine, Glamour, and Newsweek.
  • Inventing Downtown:Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952–1965 – Grey Gallery
    Between the apex of Abstract Expressionism and the rise of Pop Art and Minimalism, the New York art scene was transformed by artist-run galleries. Inventing Downtown presents works from fourteen of these crucibles of experimentation, highlighting artists’ efforts to create new exhibition venues for innovative works of art—ranging from abstract and figurative painting, assemblage, sculpture, and works on paper to groundbreaking installations and performances.
  • Review: Remembering the Tenth Street Galleries – WNYC News – WNYC 011317
    Deborah Solomon: Can we ever go back to Tenth Street? Probably not. I refer not to a specific place but to a vanished era in New York’s cultural history, a romantic time when the art scene was still centered in Greenwich Village. This was in the mid-1950s, when rent was cheap and the concept of the art market had nothing to do with American art. The main art galleries, up on Fifty-seventh Street, favored pedigreed French landscapes and portraits. Desperate to show their work, New York artists began opening galleries in nothing-special spaces along Tenth Street, between Third and Fourth Avenues. The Tanager Gallery was across the street from the Brata; the Hansa was around the corner.
    Now we have an exhibition about exhibitions. “Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965,” at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery, offers a piquant and all-important chronicle of the years before the art world became its current investment-crazed self. Curated by Melissa Rachleff, the show is an energetic and even exuberant mix of 200 works by nearly as many artists who belonged to some 14 galleries, all but one of which were located downtown. You can go through the show seeing it as a history of a defunct gallery scene; or you can see it instead an as alternative history of the painting and sculpture of the ‘50s and early ‘60s. Either way it will broaden your understanding of an era that tends to be packaged by our major museums as the story of Jackson Pollock & Company.
  • What Will the Trump Administration Mean for People With Disabilities?
    Julia Bascom: Naturally, at the top of the nightmare list is a repeal of the Affordable Care Act. The ACA is arguably second only to the Americans With Disabilities Act when it comes to game-changing disability rights law. No insurers would meaningfully cover us, so many disabled Americans historically had to live in poverty in order to qualify for Medicaid. By banning discrimination against people with pre-existing conditions, the ACA made it possible for millions of Americans with disabilities to enroll in commercial insurance, afford needed medical care, move, and change jobs. I can vividly remember a health insurance broker sitting in our kitchen with my parents when I was a teenager and urging them to kick me off our insurance and put me on Medicaid (and into a life of enforced poverty) as soon as possible, to bring our premiums down and take the burden off my father’s small business. They didn’t, and under the ACA, that nightmare was relegated to the past where it belongs—unless, of course, Trump brings it back.
  • Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter on his magazine’s big ‘Trump bump’- POLITICO Media 011817
    If the two of them didn’t have all this history? “I actually think [the coverage] would be exactly the same,” Carter said. “He’s just the most unusual president we’ve ever had, at least in most of our lifetimes. It’s this constant outflow of either erroneous information, or negative information, or semi-truthful information, and the press reacts to that. Ignoring him completely is the only other way to go. If you’re in for a penny, you’re in for a pound.”
  • Why Donald Tump Is Giving John Dean Nightmares – The Atlantic
  • Finding Ruby
  • The New Trump Defamation Lawsuit Is Daring Trump to Incriminate Himself in Court

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